Thursday, March 18, 2021

Russell Moore's Tirade Targets Wrong Youth

 In an episode of his podcast, Russell Moore interviewed Senator Ben Sasse regarding how perpetual adolescence hurts the church.

One might immediately snap what's so wrong with that?

Nothing if by that one is referring to 25 year olds still on their parents' health insurance as authorized under Obamacare or having never worked a day in their lives by the same age.

However, that is apparently not what this phrase is referring to when articulated by certain professional religionists.

Moore states in the opening of his remarks that, no matter how hard his 16 year old lads work in their grocery store jobs, it is nothing in comparison to Sasse's own sons bailing hay and birthing cattle.

But doesn't Moore rank among this contemporary breed of Evangelical that condemns those that would retreat from concentrated areas of population, no doubt going so far as to call “racist” Whites preferring a more reclusive and less urban lifestyle?

Often what these religionists mean when they complain about “perpetual adolescence” is not being married off by the age of 23.

Perhaps Moore and Sasse's time would have been better spent condemning the perpetual welfare recipients that can't seem to keep their pants on and their legs together in terms of an unending litany of out of wedlock offspring where as in the case of potato chips many can't seem to stop at just one.

By Frederick Meekins

Monday, February 15, 2021

Democrats In Uproar Over Rightwing Conspiracy Theories No Issue With Leftist Tyranny

 

Representative Marjory Greene has been removed from her committee assignments in the House of Representatives not so much for anything that she has done but rather because of what she believed.

It was claimed that the so-called conspiracy theories she is accused of professing cannot be countenanced because of the “festering malignancy” of such ideas. Nothing similar was done to punish Raphael Warnock for questionable notions the pastor has peddled or lent support to over the years of his ministry.

For example, Warnock has downplayed the atrocities of Fidel Castro, calling the Cuban dictator’s legacy complex.

Yet it’s doubtful the Georgia radical would be that judicious in his assessment of the Trump presidency despite the administration having a significantly smaller body count in terms of citizens eliminated for merely expressing an ideology at variance with that preferred by regime functionaries.

Warnack is a bit more explicit in his admiration of the late theologian James Cone, whom Warack describes as his mentor and whom Warack eulogized at his funeral.

For those not as familiar with James Cone as they might be Fidel Castro, Cone is renowned as the developer of Black Liberation theology.

As part of that interpretative school of thought, Cone equates Whites or “Whiteness” with Satan and/or the Antichrist.

His acolytes will quibble that “Whiteness” is more about the way in which such people act rather than the people themselves.

Would a renowned theologian of the contemporary era be allowed to equate “Jewishness” or better yet “Blackishness” with the most vile works of evil and be permitted to retain their endowed chair or posh ministry position?

More importantly, if the Biden Autarchy and the regime’s legislative allies in the People’s Assembly (also known as Congress in times before the assent of one party rule seemingly intent on squelching as much dissent as possible) say nothing in condemnation it must likely mean that these powerful institutions support these forms of tyranny and oppression perceived as originating from the left side of the political spectrum.

By Frederick Meekins

Wednesday, January 27, 2021

Collectivist Utopians Won't Stop With Social Media Suppression

 Utopians, especially of the revolutionary variety, are never satisfied.

That is an undeniable truth of history.

One only needs to read an account of Jacobin France, Nazi Germany, Bolshevist Russia, or Maoist China to draw such a conclusion.

In the future, one must ask, will Biden's America be added to that infamous list?

It has been pointed out that one does not have an inherent constitutional right to social media.

Since those are private corporations viewed as individuals in the eyes of the law, to compel such would be to infringe upon its rights in a coercive manner.

Perhaps fair enough.

But it must be asked will the matter stop there in regards to those commodities or services that don't quite rise to the level of government but without which the individual's quality of life is profoundly hampered?

For example, most electricity is provided through what is ultimately private enterprise.

So what if in the future an electric company does not like how its commodity is being utilized in pursuit of a perfectly legal but ideologically unacceptable values or agendas such as to light a church opposed to homosexual marriage marriage or that professed the belief in Christ alone is the only path to obtain a beatific afterlife?

In the future, sophisticated computers and Artificial Intelligence will play a role in the way in which personal vehicles are piloted.

Should individuals known to express or even be suspected of harboring certain opinions have their ignition systems shut down entirely so as to inhibit their ability to travel in a manner not unlike the interlock system imposed upon drunk drivers?

Don't laugh.

It has already been proposed that those at the Capitol Kerfuffle should be placed on the don't fly list without even having been convicted of a crime.

And who before this time thought steps would be taken to silence former presidents and seated senators who did not actually call for violence but rather whose words were not those preferred by the gatekeepers of the means of communication?

By Frederick Meekins

Saturday, January 9, 2021

For What Other Reasons Can Civil Society Be Suspended?

 

Across America, governments are invoking the power to essentially suspend civil society when hospitals are occupied at a predetermined numerical threshold.

So why does the same sort of emergency intervention not apply in other situations where human life is at stake?

For example, if there are a certain number of auto accidents for a particular period should most forms of vehicular travel be suspended for a spell?

Likewise, if the number of heart attacks and incidents of cardiac disease rise above a certain percentage in a jurisdiction, should most of the fast food establishments --- especially Starbucks --- in a given area be closed and supermarkets allowed only to sell an assortment of rudimentary vegetables?

If a particular number of domestic abuse incidents occurs, should liquor stores be closed until such an epidemic is gotten under control?

And if a state's adolescent obesity rates rise above a certain level, should Internet and smarthphone access be switched off in order to get the youth probably spending a considerable amount of time on these devices active outdoors?

By Frederick Meekins